22 Tips to Help You Nail Your Next Job Interview

 

  • First step: Know that you deserve to be there. Because you do.
  • It's ok to feel nervous. It shows you want it. Everyone you admire has felt exactly how you're feeling and still persevered. Do the same. You owe it to yourself.
  • Research the hiring manager and mirror them. In dress code, manner and formality. (If that means stalking them extensively online, so be it.)
  • Glassdoor.com is the best preparation tool ever. EVER. For larger companies, you can even view past interview questions. Result!
  • Practice your answers extensively. In the mirror, on the phone, to a friend. Practice until you're comfortable with every syllable.
  • It's also worth rehearsing your 'story statement', so when you're asked to 'tell us a bit about yourself', you've got your life story down. Two paragraphs is plenty.
  • Get to know not only their website and what they do, but any recent company news. Then be sure to reference it.
  • Take a portfolio with you. It'll help guide your thoughts and show you're prepared. Plus, a prop is ALWAYS helpful, let's be honest. 8-12 great examples is the sweet spot.
  • Remember: you're interviewing them too, you know. It goes both ways.
  • For the love of god, breathe!
  • When they offer you a drink, only ask for water. Trust me on this one.
  • Talk less about your experience, and more about your achievements. It's all about your achievements.
  • Back up every answer you give with an actual example. E.g. "around Christmas, when deadlines were tight, I was the person who kept the team motivated by doing x, y and z."
  • Even if you're in a creative role, reference your impact in numbers. E.g. "my subject lines saw open rates increase by 40%. To progress, you need to be both creative and commercially-minded.
  • "So, what's your biggest weakness?" If this age-old question comes up, structure your answer as follows: "I sometimes struggle to <insert mild professional weakness here>. But I've worked hard to improve by x, y and z." FYI, "I'm a perfectionist" is not an answer.
  • Ask curious questions. Not about company culture or working hours, but actually useful, considered questions that show you've done your research.
  • Always discuss money in your first interview. If you don't, they'll assume you're prepared to settle. Never settle.
  • On the topic of money, you don't have to disclose exactly what you're currently earning. Seriously, you don't! Instead, play it like this: "for my recent roles, I've been paid in the £50-60,000 range, and I'm looking for £60-70,000 to move." Think big. Their offer will often be lower, so make sure you're starting somewhere high.
  • Always close with an actual summary statement. An interview is like brokering a deal: you need to close it, girl.
  • Follow up and say thanks via email. Not immediately after, as that looks too keen. But around 90 mins or so? Perfect!
  • While waiting to hear back, keep exploring other options. Don't ever rest on your laurels. Staying proactive while you wait is not only good for your career, but your mental health, too.
  • The best question you can ever ask in an interview is: "What is your biggest problem right now and how I can help solve it?" 
  • Enthusiasm, in life but especially in interviews, is everything.